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Badam Halwa

Badam Halwa’ is a rich, traditional Indian sweet that melts in the mouth and is heavenly in taste. One of the most popular Indian sweets prepared during festivals like Diwali. It is also one of the mainstays in weddings.. especially in South Indian weddings..

I have followed my grandma’s recipe, which is tried and tested for over many decades by my family. Though badams are extremely healthy especially in winters, this recipe calls for lots of ghee and double the ratio of sugar to badam. I feel, once in a while during festivals, we have to treat ourselves with this kind of sinful but delectable sweet!! How to make Badam Halwa?

I have used a big pinch of saffron to enhance the colour and aroma of the halwa. Good quality saffron renders great taste to the halwa. To test the quality of the saffron, soak few strands in lukewarm milk. If the saffron is pure, milk turns pale yellow and the saffron strands retains their colour. If the saffron is impure, then the milk becomes orange or bright yellow in colour and the saffron strands becomes pale.

The quality of badam and desi ghee also plays a good role in enhancing the taste and texture of this halwa. I have used pure cow’s ghee of a reputed brand. We can also use homemade ghee if possible.

For beginners, I would like to mention that this method needs lots of stirring the halwa in low flame. It consumes lots of time.. but it is worth the effort as this method yields more quantity of halwa than any other method and needless to say it is so delectable in taste!

Badam Halwa

'Badam Halwa’ is a rich, traditional Indian sweet that is heavenly in taste and melts in the mouth. One of the most popular sweets prepared during festivals like Diwali.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Course: Sweets
Cuisine: South Indian
Keyword: Traditional Indian Sweets
Servings: 25
Author: Delicious Galore

Ingredients

  • Badam – 200 gms
  • Sugar – 2 cups 400 gms
  • Ghee – 2 cups +1/4 cup appr 550 ml
  • Full cream Milk – 1 cup + 1/2 cup (1 cup for grinding badam & 1/2 cup for soaking saffron)
  • Saffron – a big pinch

Instructions

  • Soak badam in hot water for 30 mins. Drain the water and peel the skin.
  • Grind it into a thick, coarse paste using 1 cup of milk. Please take care not to grind it finely.
  • Soak saffron in 12 cup of lukewarm milk. Keep it covered.
  • In a thick bottom kadai, mix badam paste and sugar, keep stirring in low flame.
  • When the sugar dissolves, lots of bubbles will appear. Keep stirring continuously.
  • When the bubbles decrease, (one or two is fine) add the saffron milk. The colour of the halwa changes to light yellow as soon we add the saffron milk and once again the bubbles start appearing. Keep stirring.
  • When the halwa sticks to the sides of the kadai, add melted ghee, 14 cup at a time.
  • The ghee gets absorbed into the halwa at once. Keep on adding 14 cup of ghee and stir till we are done with the whole amount of ghee (2 14 cups).
  • At this point, the halwa thickens and it starts oozing out with ghee. 10. Switch off the flame. Give a good stir for a minute and let it cool.
  • The halwa thickens even more as it cools down. Transfer it into a clean container.
  • We can wrap the halwa in small servings using a butter sheet or it can be served in small bowls too.

Notes

  • To test the quality of the saffron, soak few strands in lukewarm milk. If the saffron is pure, milk turns pale yellow and the saffron strands retains their colour. If the saffron is impure, then the milk becomes orange or bright yellow in colour and the saffron strands becomes pale.
  • For the above said quantity of badam, ghee and sugar, we will get more than 1. 15 kg (appr) of badam halwa. If we pack individual servings of about 50 gm, we can have 25 serving packs.
 

For similar Indian Sweets, plz check Wheat Halwa, Mysore Pak, Makkan Peda, Malai Kulfi, Oats Semiya Payasam.

Happy Cooking!

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Wheat Halwa

Wheat Halwa’ is a ‘must’ during Diwali at my home. There are many methods of preparing this popular Indian sweet, but the authentic and traditional way is by grinding the wheat grains and extracting the wheat milk to make this halwa. Though it is time consuming, its worth the effort as the outcome is the melt in the mouth, soft, non-gluey, delectable sweet!

Wheat Halwa

Wheat Halwa' is an authentic recipe using traditional method of grinding the wheat grains and extracting the wheat milk to get the texture and flavour intact.
Prep Time10 hrs
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Course: Sweets
Cuisine: South Indian
Keyword: Festival Recipe, Traditional Indian Sweets
Servings: 25
Author: Delicious Galore

Equipment

  • Thick bottomed kadai or pan
  • Mixer Grinder
  • Muslin cloth/strainer

Ingredients

  • 250 gms Wheat Grains
  • 2 ½ cups Sugar 500 gms
  • 1 ¼ cups Ghee 300 ml
  • ½ tsp Elaichi Powder
  • a handful Cashews broken into pieces
  • 3 drops Food Colour tomato red or dark yellow or orange food colour
  • ½ tbsp Liquid Glucose optional

Instructions

  • Extracting milk from wheat grains: Soak wheat grains in water for 10-12 hrs. Grind it into a fine paste with enough water. Using a soup strainer or a clean muslin cloth, strain and extract the milk. The first milk will be thick and white in colour. Grind the leftover wheat husk/residue again and strain the milk. If you notice some more gluten content present in the husk, grind it for the third time and extract the milk. Discard the husk/residue or use it as a manure to plants.
  • Fermenting the wheat milk: Combine the first, second, third milk and keep it covered for 10 -12 hrs. In winters, we can keep it for 24 hrs for proper fermentation. We can observe that the thick white milk got settled at the bottom and the clear pale coloured water collected on top. Discard the water. Add 6 cups of fresh water to the thick white milk. Mix it well. This step of diluting the wheat milk is very important because the gluten content in the wheat milk has to get cooked properly when making halwa, otherwise the halwa will be sticky while chewing.
  • Add 3-4 drops of food colour to the milk and mix well. Roast a handful of cashews in little bit of ghee and set aside.
  • In a thick bottomed kadai, add sugar and a cup of water and boil in high flame. When the sugar gets dissolved, add a spoon of milk to the syrup. The dirt/scum gets collected at the sides. Remove the dirt using the spoon. Boil the syrup until it reaches a single thread consistency.
  • Keep the flame low and add the diluted wheat milk and mix it well. Once it gets combined with the syrup, increase the heat to medium–high and keep stirring continuously.
  • The halwa thickens and looks transparent. If we the spatula while stirring, it will look like a transparent glass sheet. At this stage, start adding melted ghee 2 tbsp at a time. Keep stirring. Each time when you add ghee, the halwa absorbs it fast. Keep on adding the melted ghee gradually.
  • Dip a stainless steel spoon into a bowl of lukewarm water and take ½ tbsp of liquid glucose and add it to the halwa. Mix it well. (Adding liquid glucose is completely optional. Liquid glucose prevents the crystallization of sugar content in the halwa. The halwa will be smooth in texture without any white grains/crystals in it. If you don’t wish to add liquid glucose, skip the step as it will not affect the taste and consistency of the halwa).
  • Add elaichi powder and roasted cashew nuts. Keep stirring.
  • At this point we could see that the halwa gets collected, gathers into a ball and starts oozing out ghee. Switch off the flame and transfer it into a greased plate or tray. Level it using the back side of a flat bottomed cup. Let it cool and cut it into pieces.
  • Store it in a clean container. This halwa stays good for 10-12 days at room temperature.

Notes

  • When the halwa starts oozing out ghee, we can collect the excess ghee that gathers at the sides using a spoon.
  • Liquid glucose prevents the sugar content in the halwa from crystallizing, thus the halwa looks smooth without any white grainscrystals in it. This halwa stays good for 10-12 days at room temperature.
 

For similar Indian Sweets, plz check Badam HalwaMysore PakMakkan PedaMalai KulfiOats Semiya Payasam.

Happy Cooking!

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Kambam Kanji with Madhura Kizhangu Puzhukku and Chammanthi

Kambam kanji with Madhura Kizhangu Puzhukku and chammanthi is an age-old recipe that is highly nutritious and has all the parameters of a healthy balanced meal. It is gluten-free, low in calorie, rich in fiber and also diabetic-friendly. This traditional combo is not only delicious but also very light on stomach.

Kambam means bajra, Madhura Kizhangu means sweet potato and chammanthi is a chutney.  Mildly salted porridge-like Kanji is served with sweet potato curry and spicy chutney-like chammanthi.  The main ingredients in this recipe namely Kambam (pearl millet/bajra) and Madhura kizhangu (Sweet potato) have excellent source of dietary fiber, proteins, vitamins, antioxidants and more. It can be relished at any time of the day be it in breakfast or at lunch/dinner.

Kambam Kanji with Madhura Kizhangu Puzhukku and Chammanthi

Mildly salted gruel-like Kanji is served with sweet potato curry and spicy chutney-like chammanthi…a healthy balanced meal by itself…This unique combination is not only delicious but also very light on stomach.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Breakfast/Brunch
Cuisine: Kerala, South Indian
Keyword: Comfort Food, Healthy
Servings: 6
Author: Delicious Galore

Ingredients

For Kambam Kanji:

  • 1 cup Kambam/ Bajra / Pearl Millet 
  • 4 cups Water to cook
  • Salt to taste

For Madhura kizhangu Puzhukku:

  • 5 Madhura kizhangu / Sweet Potato  medium sized
  • ¼ cup Grated Coconut
  • 2 Green Chillies chopped into ½inch piece
  • 1 tsp Ginger finely chopped
  • Few Curry Leaves roughly torn
  • Haldi
  • Salt to taste
  • ½ tsp Mustard Seeds
  • ½ tsp Urad Dhal
  • ½ tsp Chana Dhal
  • ¼ tsp Hing / Asafoetida
  • ½ tbsp Coconut Oil

For Chammanthi:

  • ½ cup Grated Coconut
  • Shallots / Small Onions a handful, peeled and chopped
  • 4 Dry Red Chillies broken and seeds removed
  • Tamarind  a small gooseberry sized
  • Few Curry Leaves roughly torn
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp Coconut Oil

Instructions

For Kambam Kanji:

  • Wash kambam/bajra/pearl millet and drain excess water.
  • Pulse and coarsely grind the millet till it resembles sooji.
  • Pressure cook the millet with salt and 4 cups of water till 3 whistles.
  • Once the pressure gets released, open the cooker lid. Mix the kanji well.
  • If required add more water to bring it to gruel-like consistency. Cover and keep it aside.

For Madhura kizhangu Puzhukku:

  • Wash and pressure cook sweet potatoes till soft but firm. Peel and cut them into cubes.
  • In a kadai, heat coconut oil and add rai. When it splutters, add urad dhal, chana dhal and hing.
  • Roast till dhals turns golden in colour. Add grated ginger, green chillies and curry leaves.
  • Once the chillies get fried, add sweet potatoes, haldi and salt. Sprinkle some water.
  • Keep the flame in medium. Saute for few seconds.
  • Add grated coconut. Mix well and remove from flame.

For Chammanthi:

  • Blend the given ingredients including coconut oil into a coarse chutney-like paste. Transfer it to a serving bowl.

To serve:

  • Reheat the Kambam Kanji and serve hot with Madhura Kizhangu Puzhukku and Chammanthi.

Notes

  • In summers, you can ferment kambam kanji overnight and have it for breakfast.
  • You can also add sour buttermilk to kanji to enhance its taste and health quotient.

For similar traditional recipes, plz click plz click KootchuluCurry Leaves Spice PastePuzhimilagaiPuliyotharaiPaanagamPoondu Vengaya Vathakuzhambu, Nugulu Kanji

Happy Cooking!

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Nugalu Kanji | Rice Sooji Porridge

Nugulu Kanji’, is a humble porridge recipe that has been passed over many generations in my family. Delicious in taste and easy to digest, this kanji is more than a porridge.

A bowl of kanji everyday was the secret behind healthy and long life of our forefathers. It was then the common practice to include diluted porridge in everyday food because it gave them instant energy, nourished the immune system and prepared them for the day filled with various physical exertion.

Broken rice sooji, when cooked and tempered with desi ghee and jeera, acts as a natural coolant and reduces the body heat. Doctors prescribe this porridge to those who are suffering from fever, sore throat and cough as it lessens the infection and nourishes the immune system. Moreover, this porridge can be given to toddlers also as it aids in digestion.

Once cooked and tempered, this kanji can be savoured in two ways…either by adding little bit of milk and sugar or with thin buttermilk and salt.  Both the versions taste great!

Nugulu Kanji | Rice Sooji Porridge

Nugulu Kanji’, is a humble porridgerecipe that has been passed over many generations in my family. Delicious intaste and easy to digest, this kanji is more than a porridge.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Basic Recipe, Breakfast/Brunch
Cuisine: Indian, South Indian
Keyword: Comfort Food, Everyday Food, Healthy, Kanji, Rice Sooji Porridge, Summer Cooler
Servings: 2 people
Author: Delicious Galore

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp Broken Rice/ Rice Sooji
  • cups Water

For Tempering

  • 1 tsp Desi Ghee
  • ¼ tsp Jeera

To Serve

  • 2-3 tbsp Milk / Butter Milk-
  • Sugar / Salt to taste

Instructions

  • Bring a cup of water to boil. Add rice sooji and let it cook.
  • The amount of water varies with the type of the rice. Add ½ cup of water more if needed.
  • Rice sooji gets cooked very quickly in 1 or 2 minutes,so keep a check to avoid over cooking.
  • In a small kadai, heat desi ghee and add jeera. When it splutters,switch off the flame and pour it over the kanji. Mix well.
  • While serving, add 2-3 tbsp of milk/butter milk and sugar/salt. Mix well and serve immediately.

Notes

  • Cooked and tempered kanji stays fresh for 2 days when refrigerated. So,
    you can prepare till that step and just before serving, reheat and add milk/butter milk and sugar/salt.
  • While having this kanji as a remedy for fever, cold and cough, adding
    buttermilk can be avoided.

For more traditional recipes, plz click Kootchulu, Kambam Kanji with Madhura Kizhangu, Curry Leaves Spice Paste, Puzhimilagai, Puliyotharai, Paanagam, Poondu Vengaya Vathakuzhambu

Happy Cooking!