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Urad Dhal Laddu / Minapa Sunnundalu

One of the traditional sweets in South India, nutrient-rich Urad dhal laddu helps you have healthy indulgent during festivals. It is also known as ‘Ulutham laadu’ in Tamil Nadu and ‘Minapa Sunnundalu’ in Andhra.

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Boondi Laddu

One of the popular traditional sweets of India, ‘Boondi Laddu’ is prepared during festivals like Diwali, Ganesh Chaturthi, Navarathri and other special occasions. Also, a quintessential sweet in South Indian weddings as ‘Seer Bhakshanam’.

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Mysore Pak

Mysore Pak is one of the most popular sweets in South India. It is one of the mainstay in weddings (as a part of Kalyana Seer) and as well as in festivals like Diwali. Since everyone in my family have a pronounced sweet tooth especially for the traditional ones, I make this sweet frequently. Whenever I ask my husband and my daughter for a choice of sweet to be made, their option is always ‘Mysore pak’!

How to make Mysore Pak?

The traditional Mysore Pak looks golden brown in colour, slightly crumbly with a honey comb texture. Over the past few decades, we have a new version of Mysore Pak that is extremely soft & smooth in texture, oozing with pure desi ghee and just melts in our mouth. Many of us could guess that I’m mentioning about ‘SKS Mysurpa’, from the most famous sweet shop ‘Sri Krishna Sweets’ in South India.

Well, my recipe lies halfway between the traditional one and the SKS Mysurpa. This is one of the quick and easy methods too!

The soft Mysore Pak version calls for roasted besan, sugar and lots of desi ghee. In such sweets, the more ghee you add, the softer it becomes. So to reduce the amount of ghee without compromising the flavor and taste, I have added a small proportion of milk powder to make it softer and melt in the mouth.

Yes, This Mysore Pak is soft in texture, delicious in taste, but not oozing with ghee!!

Mysore Pak

Mysore Pak is one of the most popular sweets in South India. It is one of the mainstay in weddings (as a part of Kalyana Seer) and as well as in festivals like Diwali. My recipe lies halfway between the traditional one and the SKS Mysurpa. This is one of the quick and easy methods too!
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Course: Sweets
Cuisine: Indian
Keyword: Diwali Sweets, Traditional Indian Sweets
Servings: 20
Author: Delicious Galore

Equipment

  • Heavy Bottomed Kadai or Pan

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Gram Flour/Besan
  • 2 cups Sugar leveled
  • 1 cup Water
  • ¼ cup Milk Powder
  • ¾ cup Ghee melted

Instructions

  • Dry roast the besan over low medium flame till nice aroma emits, without changing its colour. Seive the flour to remove the lumps if any.
  • In a thick bottomed kadai, add sugar and water, bring it to boil. Stir the sugar until it dissolves . Allow to boil till it reaches a soft ball consistency.
  • Sprinkle besan and milk powder gradually over the syrup, stirring continuously till it blends well with the syrup.
  • Once it thickens slightly, add hot melted ghee 2 tbsp at a time. Keep stirring over a medium flame.
  • When the besan mixture starts frothing with lots of bubbles and leaves the sides, transfer it immediately to a greased plate.
  • Level it evenly using a flat bottomed cup and let it cool. Cut it into desired shapes. For the above given quantity, we get 20 medium sized pieces.

Notes

  • The sugar syrup consistency and the final stage are important to get the Mysore Pak soft. If these are overdone, it will become hard.

For more traditional Indian Sweets, plz checkout  Wheat HalwaBadam HalwaMakkan PedaMalai KulfiOats Semiya Payasam.

Happy Cooking!!

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Badam Halwa

Badam Halwa’ is a rich, traditional Indian sweet that melts in the mouth and is heavenly in taste. One of the most popular Indian sweets prepared during festivals like Diwali. It is also one of the mainstays in weddings.. especially in South Indian weddings..

I have followed my grandma’s recipe, which is tried and tested for over many decades by my family. Though badams are extremely healthy especially in winters, this recipe calls for lots of ghee and double the ratio of sugar to badam. I feel, once in a while during festivals, we have to treat ourselves with this kind of sinful but delectable sweet!! How to make Badam Halwa?

I have used a big pinch of saffron to enhance the colour and aroma of the halwa. Good quality saffron renders great taste to the halwa. To test the quality of the saffron, soak few strands in lukewarm milk. If the saffron is pure, milk turns pale yellow and the saffron strands retains their colour. If the saffron is impure, then the milk becomes orange or bright yellow in colour and the saffron strands becomes pale.

The quality of badam and desi ghee also plays a good role in enhancing the taste and texture of this halwa. I have used pure cow’s ghee of a reputed brand. We can also use homemade ghee if possible.

For beginners, I would like to mention that this method needs lots of stirring the halwa in low flame. It consumes lots of time.. but it is worth the effort as this method yields more quantity of halwa than any other method and needless to say it is so delectable in taste!

Badam Halwa

'Badam Halwa’ is a rich, traditional Indian sweet that is heavenly in taste and melts in the mouth. One of the most popular sweets prepared during festivals like Diwali.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Course: Sweets
Cuisine: South Indian
Keyword: Traditional Indian Sweets
Servings: 25
Author: Delicious Galore

Ingredients

  • Badam – 200 gms
  • Sugar – 2 cups 400 gms
  • Ghee – 2 cups +1/4 cup appr 550 ml
  • Full cream Milk – 1 cup + 1/2 cup (1 cup for grinding badam & 1/2 cup for soaking saffron)
  • Saffron – a big pinch

Instructions

  • Soak badam in hot water for 30 mins. Drain the water and peel the skin.
  • Grind it into a thick, coarse paste using 1 cup of milk. Please take care not to grind it finely.
  • Soak saffron in 12 cup of lukewarm milk. Keep it covered.
  • In a thick bottom kadai, mix badam paste and sugar, keep stirring in low flame.
  • When the sugar dissolves, lots of bubbles will appear. Keep stirring continuously.
  • When the bubbles decrease, (one or two is fine) add the saffron milk. The colour of the halwa changes to light yellow as soon we add the saffron milk and once again the bubbles start appearing. Keep stirring.
  • When the halwa sticks to the sides of the kadai, add melted ghee, 14 cup at a time.
  • The ghee gets absorbed into the halwa at once. Keep on adding 14 cup of ghee and stir till we are done with the whole amount of ghee (2 14 cups).
  • At this point, the halwa thickens and it starts oozing out with ghee. 10. Switch off the flame. Give a good stir for a minute and let it cool.
  • The halwa thickens even more as it cools down. Transfer it into a clean container.
  • We can wrap the halwa in small servings using a butter sheet or it can be served in small bowls too.

Notes

  • To test the quality of the saffron, soak few strands in lukewarm milk. If the saffron is pure, milk turns pale yellow and the saffron strands retains their colour. If the saffron is impure, then the milk becomes orange or bright yellow in colour and the saffron strands becomes pale.
  • For the above said quantity of badam, ghee and sugar, we will get more than 1. 15 kg (appr) of badam halwa. If we pack individual servings of about 50 gm, we can have 25 serving packs.
 

For similar Indian Sweets, plz check Wheat Halwa, Mysore Pak, Makkan Peda, Malai Kulfi, Oats Semiya Payasam.

Happy Cooking!